HOME LEARNING ACTIVITIES DURING SCHOOL CLOSURE 

Cooking at home activity – click link

COOKING AT HOME

 

Link D.T to Geography with this Food and Farming task 

Food and Farming

 

St Charles’ Catholic Primary School  

Design and Technology Curriculum Intent

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. It encourages children to learn to think and intervene creatively to solve problems both as individuals and as members of a team.

Our progressive scheme of work develops children’s skills and knowledge in design, structures, mechanisms, electrical control and a range of materials, including food. We aim to, whenever possible, link work to Maths, English and Science and other compulsory subjects on the curriculum, in a fun manner, putting these subjects into context, making them easier to digest and more understandable.

Our scheme of work encourages children to look at, evaluate and adapt existing products and systems, working creatively to design their own that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts (for example home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment).

Children are introduced to great inventors and designers from around the world who inspire and encourage the children to become innovators and risk-takers.

Implementation

The teaching and implementation of the Design and Technology Curriculum at St Charles’ Catholic Primary School is based on the National Curriculum and supported by Kapow Primary Scheme of work, ensuring a well-structured approach to this creative subject. The scheme ensures progression and repetition in terms of embedding key learning, knowledge and skills.

Staff are encouraged to teach a weekly Design and Technology lesson. This helps ensure sufficient time is allocated to D.T and that the subject matter can be revisited frequently, helping improve the rates of progression the children make. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. It is very cross – curricular and draws upon subject knowledge and skills within Mathematics, Science, History, Computing and Art. Children learn to take risks, be reflective, innovative, enterprising and resilient. Through the evaluation of past and present technology they can reflect upon the impact of Design Technology on everyday life and the wider world. Trips and visiting experts are planned for to help enhance the learning experience and improve the potential for our children to retain what they have been taught, creating long-term memories. We believe it’s important to celebrate children’s design work and encourage displays within class and around the school giving children pride and a purpose to create.

 

Early Years Foundation Stage

During the EYFS pupils explore and use a variety of media and materials through a combination of child initiated and adult directed activities. They have the opportunities to learn to:

  • Use different media and materials to express their own ideas
  • Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about form, function and purpose
  • Make plans and construct with a purpose in mind using a variety of resources
  • Develop skills to use simple tools and techniques appropriately, effectively and safely
  • Select appropriate resources for a product and adapt their work where necessary
  • Cook and prepare food adhering to good health and hygiene routines.

 

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, (for example the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment).

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, (or example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing)
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics

Evaluate

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

 

Technical knowledge

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable
  •  explore and use mechanisms, (for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles), in their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements for Food and Nutrition at KS1

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Pupils should be taught to:

  • use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes 
  • understand where food comes from. 

 

In Key Stage 2:

Within key stage 2, key events and individuals that have influenced the world of Design Technology are teaching focuses that are to be covered. 
The use of computer programmes and applications are also a key focus to be utilised by children in their design of their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment. 

 When designing and making, pupils should be taught to: 

Design 

  •  use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups 
  •  generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design 

 

 

Make 

  •  select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, such as cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, accurately 
  •  select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities 

Evaluate 

  •  investigate and analyse a range of existing products 
  •  evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work 
  •  understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world 

Technical knowledge 

  •  apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures 
  •  understand and use mechanical systems in their products, (for example as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages)
  •  understand and use electrical systems in their products, (for example series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors) 
  •  to apply their understanding of computing to programme, monitor and control their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements for Food and Nutrition at KS2 

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. 

Pupils should be taught to: 

  • understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet 
  • prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques 
  • to understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed. 

 

Impact

Our Design and Technology Curriculum is high quality, well thought out and is planned to demonstrate progression. We measure the impact of our curriculum through the following methods:

  1. Assessment of children’s learning in Design Technology is an ongoing monitoring of children’s understanding, knowledge and skills by the class teacher, throughout lessons. This assessment is then used to inform differentiation, support and challenge required by the children.
  2. The assessment milestones have been broken down for each year group ensuring the skills in Design and Technology are progressive and build year on year.
  3. Summative assessment is conducted termly by class teachers across each year group of the school to inform the subject leader of progress or skills and knowledge still to be embedded. This is recorded on a tracker grid. These judgements then inform the end of year level the children are working at.
  4. A comprehensive monitoring cycle is developed at the beginning of each academic year. This identifies when monitoring is undertaken. Monitoring in Design and technology includes book scrutinies and pupil voice interviews.

All this information is used to help inform and further develop the Design and Technology Curriculum and its impact on pupil attainment and progression.